Daily Clips

TOP STORIES

 

The Redacted Transparency Promise of Oregon Governor Kate Brown

Forbes

The governor is flaunting Oregon open records laws and blurring the line between the taxpayer-funded agency resources and her campaign activities. Furthermore, Brown used public funds for private purposes – during her time as secretary of state and as governor. Oregon taxpayers should demand answers.

 

Shooting at Le Bistro Montage in SE Portland injures one, police say

Oregonian/OregonLive

A shooting at a late-night spot beneath the Morrison Bridge known for its Cajun fare and cocktails injured one person and sent patrons scrambling into a locked room early Thursday morning, police said.

 

SPECIAL SESSION

 

Oregon Governor’s Tax Proposal Faces Criticism From All Sides

Oregon Public Broadcasting

House Democrats so dislike the tax policy that they voted to severely curtail it last year, though the bill died in the Senate. That vote led House Minority Leader Mike McLane to press Brown on her proposal. “Do you have concerns about House Democrats repealing what you propose here today, simply in the next session?” he asked. Brown replied: “In terms of repealing, I’d want to see further analysis. At this point in time, what we want to do and what we should do is provide tax fairness.”

 

Buehler wants teacher oversight bill in special session

Portland Tribune

About 12 hours after winning the GOP nomination for governor, Rep. Knute Buehler called on lawmakers to consider emergency legislation to boost oversight of teacher misconduct as part of their special session later this month.

 

Hearing exposes lawmakers’ divergent goals for special session tax bill

Statesman Journal

Republicans see it as an openly political move by Brown to appeal to small business owners in an election year. “The political optics appear to be more important than the bill itself,” Sen. Herman Baertschiger, R-Grants Pass, said during his testimony.

 

Uncertainty looms as Oregon legislators prep for special session

Oregonian/OregonLive

“I trust when you have the gavel some level of protocol deemed appropriate in the Senate will be followed, and extended to House members,” wrote Boquist, who is the vice chair of the Finance and Revenue committee and a member of the joint committee working on Brown’s plan. “If not, then we can begin the meltdown now.”

 

ELECTIONS

 

Secretary of state reacts to low primary voter turnout

News Channel 21

“The elections turnout was a little disappointing in the primary election,” Richardson said. “But what we find is if there is controversy in major issues, major primaries that are of major concern, then we will have a better turnout.”

 

Central Oregon voter turnout higher than state average

The Bend Bulletin

Voter turnout in Central Oregon for Tuesday’s primary election was higher than the statewide average. But statewide voter turnout was the lowest it’s been in 30 years for a primary election, according to the to the Secretary of State’s Office.

 

Robert Schwartz of Springfield apparent victor in GOP race for Senate District 6 nomination

The Register-Guard

“We’ll just wait and see what the final numbers are,” said Schwartz, who had collected 50.8 percent of the 8,000 votes counted in the race as of Wednesday morning. Ruck had 48.6 percent of the vote. She and Schwartz were separated by 174 votes, according to results released by the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office. It typically takes several weeks for state officials to certify election results.

 

GOP primary for 53rd House District may be headed for a recount

The Bend Bulletin

Under state law, any race that is decided by a margin of .05 percent of all ballots cast automatically goes to a recount. Currently, that threshold in the GOP primary for the 53rd House District would be 14 votes. If the race remains that tight after the additional votes are counted, a recount will be done automatically.

 

Lake County results leave one commissioner seat undecided

Herald and News

Preliminary results from the Lake County Clerk’s office posted Wednesday morning showed a flip in the results for Lake County Commissioner Position 2, which the state initially reported as Bruce Webbon carrying the majority vote by less than one percent Tuesday evening.

 

HOUSING

 

New law could pave path for more ADUs

Portland Tribune

By July 1, a 2017 state law requires most cities and counties to permit one accessory dwelling unit or ADU inside or alongside each single-family home, subject to “reasonable” design and siting regulations. ADUs can fill a vital niche given the growing housing affordability crisis, changing nature of families, and regional planning that encourages more walkable neighborhoods.

 

MISCONDUCT

 

Martin Shain pleads guilty to tax evasion in Oregon tax credit case

Oregonian/OregonLive

A Seattle-based energy consultant pleaded guilty Wednesday to evading income taxes on the $1.3 million in commissions he collected from brokering tax credits with the help of a former manager at the Oregon Department of Energy.

 

Portland commissioner Fritz won’t explain six-figure severance payout

KGW

What would happen if you went in to your boss and quit your job? Would your boss suddenly hand you $100,000? Most likely, the answer is no. But it happens at Portland City Hall. In fact, 10 times since 2015 city employees have received severance payouts of more than $100,000. And at times, a KGW investigation found there was no contractual or legal obligation to pay anything.

 

FOOD SAFETY

 

Thousands of Oregon food safety inspections still past due

Statesman Journal

Oregon’s Food Safety Program remains in disarray, a year and a half after a state audit found it was so far behind on inspections of grocery stores, food processors and other licensees that public health could be at risk.

 

HEALTHCARE

 

PEBB Makes $9.4 Million in Cuts to Keep Under Budget Cap

The Lund Report

The Public Employee Benefit Board voted to hold off on increased deductibles and other unpopular cuts to healthcare benefits for state workers while still trimming $9.4 million from 2019 expenses to keep spending under the inflation cap set by the Legislature.

 

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

 

Suit claims Medford treatment plant polluting Rogue

Mail Tribune

The Northwest Environmental Advocates claims three studies — including one funded by the city — since 2013 show nutrient levels cause unnatural algae and aquatic weed growth, damage underwater insects and at times create a sudsy, smelly plume on the river.

 

Judge to issue written ruling on restitution for teen who ignited Eagle Creek fire

Oregonian/OregonLive

Eleven requests for restitution, totaling $36, 631,687.10, were submitted to the court – an amount the 15-year-old defendant’s lawyer called “absurd,” and “silly.” His lawyer Jack Morris challenged the constitutionality of juvenile restitution on state, federal and policy grounds. He urged the court to impose a “reasonable and rational” amount.

 

POACHING

 

‘A demented social club’: Dozens more charges filed in probe of Pacific Northwest wildlife poaching ring

The Seattle Times

Prosecutors in Oregon have filed more than a hundred charges in an investigation of wildlife poaching that has spanned state lines and allegedly left dozens of animals shot illegally and often left to rot.

 

OPINION

 

Our Opinion: Track ADU law for effectiveness

Portland Tribune

Before the Legislature approved Senate Bill 1051A, for example, the city of Tigard outright banned detached ADUs, sometimes known as backyard cottages. Now, a city task force is recommending that every single-family home be allowed up to two ADUs — one inside the primary dwelling and one in the backyard.

Oregon GOP Chair Congratulates GOP Gubernatorial Nominee Knute Buehler

 

Readies Party To Unite, Sets Sights On Defeating “Train Wreck” Kate Brown

 

Wilsonville, OR – The Oregon Republican Party released the following statement on the results of last night’s Gubernatorial Primary and the GOP’s focus on defeating incumbent Governor Kate Brown in the fall.

 

 

“Congratulations to our 2018 Republican Nominee for Governor, Knute Buehler,” stated Oregon Republican Chairman Bill Currier.  “Thank you to all the candidates who competed in the GOP primary and for their words of support for our new nominee as we unite for victory in November.”

 

 

The Statesman Journal coverage reported reaction from several of the candidates for the GOP nomination, in addition to Rep. Buehler:

 

(Bend Businessman Sam Carpenter) said Tuesday that despite their disagreements, he will support Buehler.  “The people made their choice and it wasn’t me. I’m fine with that.  We need to move ahead as a party and I support the nominee.”

 

(Former Navy Pilot Greg) Wooldridge also said in a statement that he supports Buehler as the nominee and will continue to work for the betterment of Oregon.  “Gov. Kate Brown’s failed leadership has run the ship of Oregon aground.  I am going to be working on advocacy, mobilization and fundraising to help manifest change.”

 

“It speaks of the desire for change in the state of Oregon, that the status quo is no longer acceptable,” (Knute) Buehler said.”

 

 

“Now we look forward as Oregon’s Republicans and as Oregonians of every political affiliation come together to replace Oregon’s negligent, bungling, tax-hiking, anti-small businessradical George Soros-funded Governor blows off Oregon’s big problems like the PERS Crisis and considers herself above scrutiny for the misconduct and management failures, and outright abuses on her watch,” added Currier.

 

 

“Oregon has had enough of the incompetent, disastrous tenure of grandstanding political hack Kate Brown.  This fall, Oregonians have a golden opportunity to elect a Governor in Knute Buehler who will put the Brown train wreck behind us and welcome in a much brighter future for all of our state’s citizens.”

 

 

Link to Online Posting:

https://oregon.gop/congrads-knute-buehler-party-unites-defeat-kate-brown-2018-05-16

 

 

The Oregon Republican Party is the state’s arm of the Republican National Committee. Its Chairman and officers are dedicated to promoting Republican principles within the state of Oregon and to improving the lives and livelihoods of Oregon’s working families through economic freedom and equal protection under the law.

 

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Daily Clips

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

Election Day will answer a lot of Oregon political questions

The Bend Bulletin

Will there be a record low turnout for the primary? Will the race for commissioner of the Bureau of Labor and Industries be decided Tuesday by having either former House Majority Leader Val Hoyle or Tualatin Mayor Lou Ogden win a majority of the vote? And will Phil Knight’s $500,000 bet on Buehler — in the form of the largest campaign contribution ever given by an individual to a candidate in Oregon — pay off?

 

More Women Are Running, But In Oregon It’s Not Only About Trump

Oregon Public Broadcasting

This election cycle, House Republicans have more women and people of color running than in previous years. “Our party, the Republicans, have enjoyed a long diversity of thought but we haven’t always done a good job highlighting the diverse voices that exist within our party,” McLane said. “And we’ve tried to rectify that in our recruiting effort this year.”

 

LOCAL

 

Rayfield offers legislative fellowship

Corvallis Gazette-Times

Fellows learn from subject matter experts through a guest speaker series. During a previous fellowship, participants also learned how to formulate policy and then competed through a mock public hearing at the Capitol. After the 2016 fellowship, the winning policy was drafted by Rayfield for the 2017 legislative session.

 

Local CCO examines ways to improve health care

Herald and News

Though rural and frontier areas are already struggling with retaining nurses, the entire state could experience more shortages by 2025, according to 2016 reports from Oregon Health Science University’s rural listening task force.

 

ELECTIONS

 

Primary ballot totals suggest lowest voter turnout in at least 16 years

Oregonian/OregonLive

As of 9 a.m. Monday, about 19 percent had turned in their ballots, compared with the previous low of 25 percent the Monday before the 2014 primary. Total turnout in May 2014, Oregon’s most recent non-presidential nominating election, reached just 35.5 percent.

 

AP to offer election voter survey to replace exit polls

The Associated Press

The poll’s methodology allows for results from every state holding a statewide election, Scott said, as well as details about the opinions of registered voters who elect not to cast a ballot. AP’s approach will deliver to customers more reliable information on what drives the choices of different segments of the electorate than is available from traditional exit polls, Scott said.

 

Republicans hope to make gains in Oregon primary

The Associated Press

Both Republicans and Democrats are watching the outcome of the gubernatorial primary as a bellwether for conservative Oregonians. As the first statewide regular election since the 2017 inauguration of President Donald Trump, the primary also is widely seen as a referendum on which candidates are appealing to GOP voters.

 

TRANSPORTATION

 

$300 million a year from I-5, I-205 tolls? New details on tolling options

Oregonian/OregonLive

Transportation consultants offered a sneak peek at their recommendations for how and where to charge drivers in the future to navigate local freeways. It appears that tolls could come to Interstate 5 first with the option to later explore future congestion pricing on I-205 or elsewhere.

 

NATURAL RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENT

 

State will seize transient boats dumping sewage in Willamette River

KGW

Many of the boats are bought from salvage dealers for a few hundred bucks by homeless folks.They don’t have working motors to get to shore and pump out sewage or drop off garbage, no lights or anchors to be seen, and some, like one seen two weeks ago along the Eastbank Esplanade are so dangerous, they catch on fire.

 

Senators Look To Expand Thinning Work In National Forests

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The projects under this program pairs timber companies with local communities to do work in forests that became overstocked after decades of suppressing natural fires. Those tightly packed trees and brush can increase the risk of forest diseases and for larger, more severe wildfires. The bill has the backing of a wide array of environmental and timber groups.

 

Oregon To Replace 450 Old Diesel School Buses

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The state of Oregon will pay to replace 450 old diesel school buses using some of the $72.9 million dollars it expects to receive through the Volkswagen emissions cheating court settlement.

 

PUBLIC HEALTH

 

Kids Are Taking Fewer Antibiotics, More ADHD Meds

Oregon Public Broadcasting

More children than ever are alive today because they’ve survived diseases that require medical treatment, he notes. Yet certain drugs are still overused. And in other instances, such as ADHD drugs, there’s disagreement about when treatment is appropriate.

 

JOBS

 

Oregon sheds jobs for the first time in 16 months as economic slowdown continues

Oregonian/OregonLive

In a study released last week, Oregon regional labor economist Pat O’Connor found state “wage growth slowing to a grinding halt” beginning last summer. The slowdown coincided with the weakening job market, according to O’Connor, but he said Oregon’s aging work force may also be a contributing factor.

 

TAXES

 

Grocers pour $2 million into effort to ban taxes on food

Oregonian/OregonLive

Grocery companies have raised and spent more than $2 million over the last year on paid signature gatherers, advertising and other costs to advance a proposal that would ban taxes and fees on sales of food, Initiative Petition 37.

 

OPINION

 

State water actions taken without first determining what the actual facts are

Senator Dennis Linthicum

My question is, exactly how does OWRD make their “determination” establishing that substantial groundwater interference occurs with a surface water right-holder? How does OWRD determine the transmissivity value or size and shape of the cone of depression?

 

Guest column: Install cameras in the classroom

The Bend Bulletin

This is the reverse of “1984” and “Big Brother.” With Orwell, it was to ensure only the approved point of view is shared. In this case, the cams are to ensure a variety of points of view are shared. To ensure the accuracy and quality of lesson content is maintained.

 

Commentary: Care about digital privacy? Then prove it

The Bend Bulletin

Students were asked to provide the email addresses of their friends to the researchers. To entice them to do so, some were offered free pizza. It turns out that if you offer the students free pizza, the likelihood that they will protect the privacy of their friends is cut in half. Surprisingly, this result was the same for students who reported high or low degrees of concern about protecting their privacy from businesses, the government and the public in general.

 

Portland teacher: Our union must make student safety a top priority (Guest opinion)

Oregonian/OregonLive

As a veteran educator and dedicated union member, I am shocked and disappointed by the failure of my union, Portland Association of Teachers, to make the safety of children our top priority. The Portland Association of Teachers must show willingness to revise any policy that discards records of teachers who have a history of any form of abuse toward protected classes, including race, religion, gender, sexuality and disability.

 

Guest column: Public lands should be for the public to enjoy

The Daily Astorian

While outdoor recreation continues to grow in popularity and economic impact, some barriers still exist. Well-intentioned but overly burdensome federal rules often stymie access to recreation on public lands while not providing any additional protections to our natural resources.

 

Gov. Kate Brown’s election-year epiphany

OREGON HOUSE REPUBLICAN OFFICE

 

In Case You Missed It

Gov. Kate Brown’s election-year epiphany

 

Editorial: Gov. Kate Brown’s election-year epiphany

The Oregonian Editorial Board

 

How odd that Gov. Kate Brown would be convening legislators for a special session to expand a controversial tax break benefiting businesses. She is, after all, the same governor who has railed about Oregon’s businesses not paying their “fair share” of taxes. She has bemoaned cuts to government services as revenue hasn’t kept up with spending. But suddenly, Brown is so distressed that some businesses haven’t been eligible for a three-year-old tax break that she is calling an emergency session for lawmakers to write them in? “Odd” doesn’t begin to describe the weirdness of her position.

 

“Opportunistic,” however, does.

 

In this election year, Brown is looking to make amends with small businesses after she signed a bill to disconnect Oregon’s tax code from a new federal tax deduction benefiting “pass-through” businesses whose owners report business income on their personal tax returns. The disconnect means those businesses could not claim that deduction in calculating their state taxes as they normally would.

 

But this is more than a political stunt. Brown’s proposal to allow sole proprietorships to claim millions in tax breaks is a reckless step in the wrong direction for a state that has no plan for how it will absorb Medicaid costs and pension contributions that are set to escalate in 2019. Instead, her proposal would create a new giveaway that largely benefits wealthier sole proprietorships without any clear payoff for the public. It also helps cement the existence of a controversial tax break that legislators have rightly been looking to undo. And it only ramps up the difficulty in overhauling Oregon’s tax system into one that is fairer, less volatile and delivers the revenue that this state needs.

 

As awkward as it might be, Brown should recognize the harm of expanding this tax break, cancel the special session and win voters over by showing leadership on matters of true urgency.

 

Cancelling now could save her embarrassment down the road. Senate President Peter Courtney, who questioned the need for a special session, told The Oregonian/OregonLive’s Hillary Borrud that it’s unclear whether Brown has the votes to pass her proposal. That’s not entirely surprising considering House Democrats last year sought to dramatically narrow the tax break, which was passed in 2013 as part of the “Grand Bargain” of tax and pension changes choreographed by former Gov. John Kitzhaber. Most of the pension reforms were invalidated by the Oregon Supreme Court. But the tax break, which lets pass-through business owners pay lower marginal tax rates on their income up to $5 million, survived, benefiting law firms, doctors’ offices and many high-income earners that employed at least one non-family member. Sole proprietorships were excluded from the break, the “inequity” that Brown is now seeking to rectify years after the fact.

 

Chris Pair, Brown’s spokesman, said the governor has no intention of canceling the special session and is unwilling to put it off any longer. “Waiting until 2019 to make this change will only cost the businesses themselves,” Brown’s office said in a prepared statement about the proposed legislation.

 

That’s not a reason to convene lawmakers out of session; in fact, that’s an argument for waiting. Because changing it now will cost Oregonians about $11 million a year, according to the Legislative Revenue Office. While that’s a small sum compared to the budget as a whole, it’s a significant amount for the agencies and programs that have had to cut services due to insufficient appropriations in this current budget cycle.

 

Pair also said that there’s broad agreement among legislators that “it is only fair for small businesses to receive the same tax treatment as large businesses in this state.” Funny that that didn’t concern Brown or many legislators last year when they passed a new Medicaid tax that hit small businesses – but not large companies like Nike and Intel.

 

And, to be clear, while Brown likes to say that her proposal helps Oregon’s “mom and pop” businesses, many won’t be able to take advantage of it. Brown is creating her own “inequity” among sole proprietorships by barring from eligibility any that do not employ at least one non-family member for at least 30 hours a week. Including them would cost Oregon even more in foregone revenue, digging the state’s financial hole even deeper.

 

It’s not surprising that Brown would be trying to shore up support in the business community. She’s alienated many with her reluctance to address skyrocketing spending, her support for expensive mandates on employers and the selectively-applied Medicaid tax. But while Brown is expected to easily win the Democratic primary, she could face a far tougher race in November if Bend legislator Knute Buehler wins the Republican primary next week.

 

Brown could try burnishing her credentials by countering Buehler’s thoughtful proposals for addressing Oregon’s fiscal problems with some of her own. Unfortunately, her call for a special session to “fix” a non-urgent matter of debatable “inequity” reveals a governor of gimmicks, not gumption.

 

Click here to view this editorial online.

 

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DEADLINE May 15th 8PM: Vote for Lou Ogden Stop The Bullies From BOLI

Dear Oregon GOP Central Committee Members,

The BOLI race is an important race and could be over in next Tuesday if Lou Ogden can get 50%+ of the vote.  Turnout is very low so far for the May 2018 Primary, so this race could go either way.  We need to turnout Republicans for Lou to bring victory!  Please share the following email with as many of your grassroots member and support email lists as possible.

Oregon Republican Party

Kevin Hoar


The May Primary Election ends this coming Tuesday, May 15th 8 pm and there is a VERY IMPORTANT race on the ballot that you might not have heard much about – the race for the Commissioner for the Bureau of Labor and Industry (BOLI).

Though officially a non-partisan race, there is actually one registered Republican, the exceptionally-qualified Tualatin Mayor Lou Ogden, who is running against two Democrats.

This race is to replace infamous outgoing BOLI Commissioner Brad Avakian who became known in 2016 as “The Bully from BOLI” due to his zealous persecution of employers across the state, particularly small businesses who lack the resources to confront bureaucratic bullies like Avakian.  With Avakian, we’ve seen nearly ten years of sheer abusive, anti-jobs hyper-partisanship.  He’s taken personal political pride in driving small businesses out of business.  It’s a big part of the reason why he lost the race to our current Republican Secretary of State Dennis Richardson in 2016.

Though Avakian’s not running again this year, the leading registered Democrat seeking to be his replacement, former State Rep. Val Hoyle, would be even worse.  This isn’t just the opinion of Republicans, but also of business associations like the non-partisan Oregon State Chamber of Commerce AND even liberal media outlets like the Portland Tribune, which has endorsed Lou Ogden, said this about Val Hoyle:

“Hoyle is far too entrenched as a Democratic Party apparatchik….(and) was not a great legislator. She chaired the House Democratic Caucus, where she garnered a reputation for a my-way-or-the-highway approach to issues that turned off lawmakers of both parties. The word in Salem was that her own caucus wasn’t heartbroken when she left office… (Hoyle) is a Democratic party leader and, we fear, would use the pulpit of BOLI to bolster Democratic issues, to curry labor votes, and to serve as a de facto arm of the party that runs the governor’s office and both chambers of the Legislature.”

Oregon’s businesses and workers can’t afford to see her elected.  Without healthy, growing businesses, there is no labor.

To put an end to the reign of Bullies at BOLI, we need to get Republicans to return their ballots and vote for Lou Ogden.  Lou is the only candidate who has made it 100% clear that he will restore balance, fairness, and trust back to the state agency.   Lou Ogden has served nearly 24 years as the non-partisan mayor of one of the most successful cities in Oregon.  Under Lou’s leadership, the City of Tualatin has seen a 3 billion dollar increase in total asset value of private sector investments, creating 34,000 private sector jobs – more jobs than people who live in Tualatin!

With your support, Lou Ogden can help replicate Tualatin’s success across Oregon for the many who have not seen this kind of prosperity and opportunity where they live and work.  Imagine, instead of traumatized small businesses and oppressive government bureaucracy, Oregon’s job creators could have a partner in generating the opportunities our state’s workers can fulfill, while workers gain a chance at achieving the American dream – in Oregon!

But Lou is being outspent by liberal special interests and hundreds of thousands in out-of-state union money.  So, in addition to marking your ballot for Lou Ogden, here’s how you can help Lou to victory on May 15th!

  1. Make a contribution to him TODAY via Paypal at www.vote4LouOgden.com.
  2. Go knock on your neighbors’ doors and tell them to vote for Lou and get their ballots turned in right away.
  3. “LIKE” Lou’s Facebook page and share it with your friends => https://www.facebook.com/Vote4LouOgden/
  4. Email your lists and include in your newsletters the need to Vote for Lou Ogden.
  5. Volunteer to help get out the vote.  Contact the Ogden campaign at Lou@LouOgden to learn how.
We need to make sure every Republican marks their ballot for Lou.  We can win this race, but not without you!

IMPORTANT:  It is too late to mail in your ballot.  If you expected a ballot, but didn’t get one, go to your county elections office ASAP.  Make sure you to take your ballot to one of the official ballot drop off sites which can be found here – the DEADLINE IS 8PM this coming TUESDAY MAY 15th 2018!

Thank you!Bill Currier, Chairman

Oregon Republican Party

 

Paid for by the Oregon Republican Party
Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.

The Oregon Republican Party is strengthened by supporters like you.

 

Daily Clips

TOP STORIES

 

East Medford residents awaken to find KKK recruiting flier

Mail Tribune

The Jacobs and other Medford residents discovered the fliers and candy Sunday morning, left in the dark of night on their driveways or the sidewalk nearby. It is unknown how many fliers were distributed, but dozens could be seen scattered throughout northeast neighborhoods.

 

Trump decides to exit nuclear accord with Iran

Oregonian/OregonLive

Administration officials began informing congressional leaders about Trump’s plans Tuesday. One person briefed on the talks characterized the president’s position as similar to his stance on the Trans-Pacific Partnership — that he would pull out but remain open to the possibility of renegotiating a better deal.

 

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

Libertarians propose special session ‘walkout’

Portland Tribune

“We are also calling on Republican legislators to walk out of the session, denying the Democrats a quorum, if an attempt is made to expand the scope of the session beyond tax relief.”

 

Oregon Supreme Court to get new chief justice

The Associated Press

Oregon will soon have a new chief justice of the state Supreme Court. Oregon law limits the term of a chief justice to six years, and Thomas Balmer was named chief in May 2012.

 

ELECTIONS

 

Turnout Light So Far for May 15 Primary Election

Willamette Week

With just a week to go before the May 15 primary election, voter turnout is tepid. Figures from the Oregon secretary of state elections division show that through May 7, just 8.6 percent of eligible voters have returned their ballots.

 

Bledsoe challenges incumbent Nearman in House District 23

Corvallis Gazette-Times

Bledsoe, who also has a background in agriculture, as a hospital chaplain and in the financial industry, describes herself as a “fiscally conservative, socially moderate candidate.” She has pledged not to accept special interest donations.

 

Primary races coming down to the wire

The Bend Bulletin

On climate change, Buehler and Wooldridge said they believed the human effect on climate was real but that Democrats have used it as an issue to reward special interests. Carpenter said there was “insufficient evidence” for a human effect and that regardless, environmental issues need to be balanced with economics.

 

EDUCATION

 

50 percent of Salem-Keizer special education students don’t graduate

Statesman Journal

Students who don’t earn a diploma are at greater risk of relying on social services, according to the Foundation of Educational Choice, also known as EdChoice. This costs taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars more every year in Medicaid, lost tax revenue and incarceration costs.

 

North Bend School District faces discrimination claims after LGBTQ students allegedly forced to read Bible for punishment

Coos Bay World Link

“There is substantial evidence to support the allegation that the district subjected LGBTQ students to separate or different rules of behavior, sanctions, or other treatment…,” the letter read. There was also substantial evidence that using the Bible as punishment had a “chilling effect on LGBTQ students’ use of the district’s complaint process.”

 

PUBLIC HEALTH

 

Public health departments combat STD, STI increases in Southern Oregon

Herald and News

Sexually transmitted infections and diseases have been on the rise not only in Klamath County but also throughout Oregon and the U.S., local health officials say. To prepare for this, the Oregon Health Authority awarded $3.9 million to several state and regional departments. But the grants are just one puzzle piece to what Vanbragt describes as an overall shift in culture, which includes how people talk about STDs and STIs.

 

BUSINESS

 

Small businesses employ the most workers in Central Oregon

The Bend Bulletin

The lion’s share of Central Oregonians, about 78 percent, work in companies that employ nine or fewer employees, according to the annual data collected by the nonprofit corporation. Companies averaged 11 employees in 2018.

 

Amazon data centers cause spat

The Associated Press

The local governments have a disagreement on how to allocate a yearly payment that’s part of the development deal, according to a report by the East Oregonian.

 

Nike purge continues — five more managers out

Oregonian/OregonLive

But this time, one of the executives is a woman, a sign that the vague executive misbehavior cited by the company through this wave of dismissals is more complicated than male-female sexual harassment.

 

AGRICULTURE & ENVIRONMENT

 

Jefferson County seeks feedback for updated farm and forest regulations

The Bend Bulletin

The Jefferson County Community Development Department is soliciting feedback from county residents regarding potential updates to zoning codes for exclusive farm use and forest management zones.

 

A year in, Coba focused on state technology, workforce

Portland Tribune

When she was appointed, Coba made a list of her priorities in the new post: recruit a younger and more diverse state workforce; advocate for accountability and transparency in state government; foster government leadership and restore trust in government.

 

Low snowpack signals more drought for parts of Oregon

Portland Tribune

Across the state, more than half of the agency’s snow monitoring sites had less than 70 percent of the normal peak snowpack. Only eight monitoring sites were normal, all of them on the west side of the Cascades and most located on the slopes around Mount Hood, the conservation service reported.

 

LOCAL

 

Council candidate slams mayor for opposition to Portland retail tax measure

Oregonian/OregonLive

Hardesty, in the email blasted out to supporters Sunday from her campaign account, wrote that Wheeler is “trying to kill three years of work by communities of color” by working against the tax with the Portland Business Alliance.

 

IMMIGRATION

 

A Controversial Jail in The Dalles Says It Will Stop Turning Over Undocumented Immigrants to ICE Agents

Willamette Week

The jail’s policy to provide jail beds to the federal agency has drawn fire from critics who say the facility may be in violation of Oregon’s sanctuary law, which bars local agencies from using state resources to enforce federal immigration regulations.

 

NORCOR Jail Changes Immigration Policy

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The jail, known as NORCOR, officially changed its policy last month after settling a lawsuit with a Hood River man who said officials at NORCOR violated his constitutional rights.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

 

Russian hackers posed as IS to threaten military wives

The Associated Press

Ricketts was one of five military wives who received death threats from the self-styled CyberCaliphate on the morning of Feb. 10, 2015. The warnings led to days of anguished media coverage of Islamic State militants’ online reach. Except it wasn’t IS. The Associated Press has found evidence that the women were targeted not by jihadists but by the same Russian hacking group that intervened in the American election and exposed the emails of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign chairman, John Podesta.

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: Tax plan could lead to mischief

Albany Democrat-Herald

For fans of political posturing, this special session could well shape up as truly a special occasion, as legislators and other elected officials pivot toward November’s general election. For fans of tax reform that could benefit a range of Oregon small businesses, the session might not turn out to be all that special.

 

Portland Schools’ broken promises to provide equal education: Guest opinion

Oregonian/OregonLive

We teach our children to work together. We teach them if someone is harmed, you stand up and make it right. We teach them that you keep your promises. These are lessons for which Portland Public Schools needs a reminder. We are parents of students at Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary in Northeast Portland, and we are tired of the broken promises to our kids.

 

Editorial: Expand affordable housing pilot

The Bulletin Editorial Board

The state shouldn’t have to pick one winner because that means Oregonians lose. When the Legislature reconvenes next year, it should expand the program.

Daily Clips

TOP STORIES

 

Missouri to hold session to consider impeaching governor

The Register-Guard

All of Missouri’s top Republican and Democratic legislative leaders already had called on Greitens to resign, which he has declined to do. “Pursuing impeachment against a Missouri governor is history none of us wants to make, but Eric Greitens’ actions have made it unavoidable,” said House Minority Leader Gail McCann Beatty.

 

LEIF TO JOIN LEGISLATURE NEXT WEDNESDAY

KQEN NEWS RADIO

Leif was appointed to fill the seat vacated by Dallas Heard when he recently moved to the Oregon State Senate. Leif will fill the seat for the rest of this year, and is a candidate for the position in the May Primary Election.

 

Lawmaker hopes Oregon ‘Special Session’ focuses on tax cuts

NBC

“I just hope, having pulled us in on that excuse that they don’t expand the legislatures prerogative at that point and begin passing gun control bills, rent control bills, cap and trade bills, because once they’re in session, they can do whatever they want,” said McLane.

 

Portland campaign to tax large corporations to address climate change gets go-ahead

Portland Tribune

“We are good to go, and the measure is constitutional, and we are ready to hit the streets on signature collection,” said Damon Motz-Storey, spokesman for the campaign. The ballot initiative would levy a 1 percent surcharge based on the sales of retailers and service companies with more than $1 billion in total sales and $500,000 in Portland sales, with money going to pay for solar panels, home weatherization, job training and other projects to reduce carbon emissions.

 

STATE GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

Gov. Kate Brown Pushes Back on Secretary of State Dennis Richardson’s Characterization of Their Relationship

Willamette Week

In a brief interview with Secretary of State Dennis Richardson published this week, WW asked Richardson about his relationship with other state-wide elected officials, who are all Democrats. Richardson said he’d gotten a cold shoulder from Gov. Kate Brown. Chris Pair, a spokesman for Brown, took issue with that characterization.

 

ELECTIONS

 

Governor releases tax returns

Portland Tribune

“Oregon voters need to know where their governor stands on issues, and they deserve to know that their governor is playing by the rules and paying their fair share,” Brown said in a statement. Both Wooldridge and Carpenter declined a request from the Pamplin/EO Capital Bureau for a copy of their 2017 tax returns. Buehler will consider releasing his tax returns after the primary election, said his campaign manager, Rebecca Tweed.

 

DHS & FOSTER CARE

 

Lawsuit Alleges Oregon Failed To Care For Foster Kids

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Instead of investigating when signs of abuse surfaced, the lawsuit alleges the state Department of Human Services attempted to cover up the severity of the abuse and its own lack of oversight in the foster home.

 

Workplace culture at the heart of DHS problems

Portland Tribune

The lawsuit, filed last Friday in U.S. District Court, claims DHS mishandled placement and subsequent physical and sexual abuse allegations of three foster children at a home in Keizer. The plaintiffs contend that many of the missteps by DHS in the case were “consistent with its organizational culture and lack of accountability.”

 

Oregon pilot program for foster system lawyers ‘wildly successful’ but limited

The Oregonian/OregonLive

In the first two counties where the new approach was instituted, Linn and Yamhill, it appears to benefit both families and taxpayers: A higher share of children have been returned to their parents, and fewer children enter the of foster care system in the first place. The wait time for children to get permanent homes – adoption, guardianship or a return to biological parents – also decreased.

 

AGRICULTURE & ENVIRONMENT

 

Klamath Falls farmer struggling to stay afloat after water decision

News 10

“Devastating is kind of an understatement. My family has been here since 1909 and everything we’ve worked for our whole entire life is in jeopardy,” said the fifth generation farmer. Earlier this week, a federal judge denied farmers, like Cheyne’s, request to overturn a ruling to save water to protect salmon.

 

$10.3 million in drought relief OK’d

Herald and News

“They understand the importance and the dire situation we’re in and the need to move as rapidly as possible on the water,” Walden said. “I know they’re working and I know they’re working in good faith, and we’re looking forward to getting our hands on the work plan as well.”

 

When can we kill wolves?

Herald and News

Tom Collom, with Oregon Fish and Wildlife, said federal delisting would not automatically mean ranchers could cull wolves. This news was frustrating for residents who believe they are being forced to live with wolves by policymakers who have no understanding of or investment in livestock production.

 

Another Willamette Valley county says no to solar on prime farmland

Portland Business Journal

The Yamhill County Board of Commissioners on Thursday adopted a ban on commercial solar power projects on high-value farmland. A 2-1 vote made it the second Willamette Valley county to choose green fields over green energy; last month, Marion County put a moratorium on solar applications while it works on a long-term policy.

 

BUSINESS

 

Nike CEO calls all-staff meeting to apologize for company culture

Portland Business Journal

Parker commended the employees that called out issues at Nike, saying “their voices do matter … and your bravery is making us better.” Parker went on to describe the evolution Nike must now make in light of the revelations about the company’s culture, which some current and former female employees have described as a “boys’ club.”

 

Fast-food restaurants feeling labor shortage

The Bend Bulletin

With unemployment at a 17-year low, businesses everywhere are struggling to find workers. Fast food is feeling the pinch acutely, especially as one important source of workers has dried up. In 2000, about 45 percent of those between 16 and 19 had a job — today, it’s 30 percent.

 

California court rules on case involving gig-economy jobs

The Bend Bulletin

A sweeping California Supreme Court ruling that redefines when employers can classify workers as independent contractors could blow up the business models of Uber, Lyft and dozens of other companies that rely on gig workers.

 

Oregon’s tech industry appears to have plateaued

The Oregonian/OregonLive

Tech employment in Oregon, which grew by 6.6 percent in 2010, expanded less than 1 percent in each of the past two years, the numbers show, and tech’s share of Oregon’s job market has fallen modestly in that time.

 

Hemp industry loses case against US drug enforcement agency

Corvallis Gazette-Times

The decision, issued Monday by a three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit in San Francisco, means that hemp producers can only sell cannabidiol where it is allowed under state law. It also means that states that allow CBD — even if they don’t allow the sale of high-THC marijuana – are violating federal law, the same as states that allow recreational cannabis.

 

POPULATION & URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARIES

 

Sherwood withdraws growth boundary request

Portland Tribune

The Sherwood City Council has voted unanimously to halt a proposal to grow by several hundred acres. The effect on the rest of the region is unclear. The entire region is experiencing an affordable housing crisis, in large part because of a lack of new homes for the thousands of people moving here every year.

 

Oregon’s Natural Population Growth Hit Record Low Last Year, As Deaths Increased Faster Than Births

Willamette Week

One bleak sign for rural Oregon: between 2010 and 2017, 16 counties, Josephine, Douglas, Coos, Curry, Lincoln, Tillamook, Crook, Baker, Wallowa, Lake, Wheeler, Wasco, Gilliam, and Sherman, recorded more deaths than births.

 

OTHER

 

OREGON HORSE FILES $100,000 SUIT AGAINST FORMER OWNER FOR NEGLECT

KDVR

The suit claims that Oregon law and legal precedent has established that a horse is a ‘sentient being,’ and can be ‘the victim of the crime—an animal entitled to statutory protection.’ “Oregon courts recognize both that animals are victims and that victims have a right to sue their abusers,” the suit claims.

 

OPINION

 

Guest column: Oregon needs Knute Buehler’s vision and leadership

The Bend Bulletin

We need a governor who can articulate viable options and shows the commitment and fortitude to address the difficult and complex issues that worry us all.

 

Ogden gets nod in BOLI race; position shouldn’t be elected
Portland Tribune

But more importantly, we urge the governor and the Legislature to address an issue that has been obvious for years, and is glaringly obvious this year: The Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor and Industries should not be an elected position.

 

Ogden best choice for BOLI post

Herald and News

Without hesitation, he condemned the big-punishment approach of Commissioner Avakian saying that the $135,000 fine in the Melissa Wedding cake case that put the bakery out of business, was excessive and should not have rolled out as it did. In contrast his opponent Hoyle said she really didn’t know enough about the case to have an opinion. Really?

 

DNA a great help to law enforcement but just how far should its use go?

Herald and News

The potential for abuse is rampant. DNA is not like a fingerprint. Someone’s genetic code can reveal all sorts of things, such as whether the person has a chronic medical condition or is at risk for developing cancer.

 

Daily Clips

TOP STORIES

 

City of Portland Lawsuit, Aimed at Hiding Public Records from a Union-Busting Nonprofit, Tossed Out by a Judge

Willamette Week

The city of Portland’s efforts to withhold public records from the Freedom Foundation, a union-busting nonprofit, have ended in failure.

 

Hundreds join May Day rally at Oregon State Capitol

Statesman Journal

Supporters clutched signs reading “Stop ICE raids” and “Keep Oregon a sanctuary state” and craned their necks to watch Brown sign House Bill 4111 and Senate Bill 1563.

 

ELECTIONS

 

Worried About Your Ballot Security This Election? Dennis Richardson Says to Chill Out

Willamette Week

WW: After 17 months in office, what letter grade would you give Oregon for electoral integrity?

Dennis Richardson: I would give us an A. Oregon’s system is as secure or more secure than any other state. And I’ve told people, if the system were corrupt as some critics fear, I never would have been elected.

 

Candidates present House, Senate case

Hood River News

Helfrich said PERS (Public Employee Retirement System) is the top funding issue that must be solved before change can occur, such as economic development and education.

 

No rest for 54th House District candidates

The Bend Bulletin

Helt says she plans to reach out to “every voter” regardless of registration. “I am not polarizing,” Helt said. “I work across the aisle. I’ve done that on the school board. I’ve done that in lobbying on issues important to me.”

 

May primary could determine whether Oregon Legislature’s Democrats move left

The Oregonian/OregonLive

“My biggest priority is that Rod Monroe is not elected so we can make some progress on forward thinking on tenants’ rights in the Legislature,” said Margot Black, an organizer for Portland Tenants United.

 

Voters can comment on gun initiative titles

Portland Tribune

Voters have until May 8 to comment on a proposed ballot title for a measure that would criminalize the transfer and possession of certain firearms — intended to restrict “assault-style” weapons and high-capacity magazines — in Oregon.

 

Walden leads in fundraising; McLeod-Skinner is second

Mail Tribune

“We don’t need to outraise Greg Walden,” McLeod-Skinner said. “We just need to get more votes than Greg Walden.

 

A Donation to an East Portland Incumbent Senator Will Create Awkward Conversations for Democrats

Willamette Week

Democratic interest groups, including the three largest public employee unions and the Oregon Trial Lawyers Association, however, have endorsed Fagan. Those groups are also major supporters of the Senate Democrats—which makes the SDLF giving money to Monroe awkward, especially if either Fagan or Jama unseats him.

 

The Dialogue: How Readers Weighed in On Our Editorial Endorsements for May’s Primary Election

Willamette Week

Barbara Buono, former adviser to Mayor Ted Wheeler, via Twitter: “One of the whitest cities in the U.S. is poised to elect its first woman of color to council.  Is Portland ready to walk its progressive talk?”

 

Joey Nations Brawled on the Portland Waterfront in a MAGA Helmet. Now He Wants to Represent Oregon in Congress.

Willamette Week

“We’ve been losing the culture war in this country big time,” Nations said on the steps of the state Capitol, video shows. “If you haven’t been paying attention, they own the TV, they own the colleges, they own the public schools. Culturally, the war has been over for a long time. And now we’re starting it up again.”

 

STATE & NATIONAL GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

Judge Walker violated victim’s right to be heard, Oregon Supreme Court rules

The Oregonian/OregonLive

His victim was his ex-girlfriend, Dana Parks, who attended Ball’s Jan. 29 sentencing to read her victim’s impact statement. While giving her statement to the court, Parks was interrupted three times by Judge Walker and ultimately not allowed to finish speaking. “I think Ms. Parks has said enough,” Walker said, before walking out of the courtroom.

 

Planned Parenthood Sues To Block Trump’s ‘Radical Shift’ In Family Planning Program

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The document, known as a Federal Opportunity Announcement, calls for a broad range of family planning services and makes multiple mentions of “fertility awareness” — also known as the rhythm method or natural family planning — but does not specifically mention contraception.

 

BUSINESS

 

Hwang to offer franchise deals for Joy Teriyaki chain

The Portland Tribune

“The cost of running a business is rising right now,” Hwang told The Outlook. “I don’t want to fire my employees, and I don’t want to raise my prices. The last option I had was to franchise it, so I have less liability.”

 

Desperate to hire, more businesses open door to pot smokers

The Associated Press

Those employers and many others are quietly taking what once would have been a radical step: They’re dropping marijuana from the drug tests they require of prospective employees.

 

Commissioners approve youth wage funding

The Albany Democrat Herald

The program will assist small businesses — 35 employees or fewer — in hiring first-time employment youth, who has not previously worked for the employer.

 

AGRICULTURE & ENVIRONMENT

 

Tensions rise as OWRD regulates wells in Sprague River

Herald and News

Boyd estimates that Upper Basin irrigators, including in the Wood River Valley area, could lose up to 35 percent of their farming revenues due to well shutoffs, adding that it could cause trouble for those growing crops such as alfalfa.

 

Oregon, Washington Suing EPA Over Vehicle Emission Standards

Oregon Public Broadcasting

“The vehicle emissions standards protect the environment and save consumers money with better fuel economy,” said Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson in a press release. “The EPA once again is ignoring the needs of consumers, its duty to protect the environment and most importantly, the law.”

 

PUBLIC HEALTH

 

US opioid crisis passes this disturbing milestone

Mail Tribune

The U.S. opioid crisis has passed a dubious milestone: Overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids like fentanyl have surpassed deaths involving prescription opioids.

 

OPINION

 

Bill Post doesn’t think call for a special session a good idea

Representative Bill Post

Gov. Kate Brown has called for a Special Session of the Oregon Legislature for either May or June. This is due to the signing of Senate Bill 1528, the $244 million increase in business taxes. Rather than giving this bill (which had bipartisan “NO” votes) a veto, Brown signed it and then called for a “one day” Special Session to “fix” it.

 

Editorial: GOP race for governor is intriguing

Corvallis Gazette-Times

The GOP race still seems to be Buehler’s to lose: He has a substantial edge in fundraising and experience, but it’s not entirely clear that Republican voters in Oregon (or elsewhere, for that matter) are that impressed by candidates with political experience.

 

Editorial: Choose Flynn for Supreme Court

Bend Bulletin Editorial Board

Flynn’s time on the bench and lifetime career in Oregon give her a breadth of knowledge and experience that Pounds cannot match.

 

Wooldridge shows up: Letter to the editor

The Oregonian/OregonLive

Thankfully, I voted for Greg Wooldridge before reading your editorial. Mocking his flight abilities and alleging lack of governmental experience is a cheap shot.

 

Rep. Rod Monroe should continue delivering results to East County: Editorial endorsements 2018

The Oregonian Editorial Board

Neither Fagan nor Jama expressed much interest in curbing Oregon’s spending. Instead, they focused their attention and ire almost entirely on the business community, pointing to increased taxation as the solution to Oregon’s budget woes. Yet, their clear disdain for the business community reflects a lack of the political diplomacy needed to negotiate with those same players to secure such revenue increases.

 

Christine Drazan for House District 39; Peterson for Metro Council President: Editorial endorsements 2018

The Oregonian Editorial Board

They should choose Christine Drazan, a 45-year-old mother of three with legislative chops who acutely feels the state’s education crisis. She points to the inequity in her district alone, where one high school graduates 88 percent of its seniors and another has struggled to improve its graduation rate from 38 percent to 44 percent.

 

Daily Clips

 

TOP STORIES

 

Mayor Ted Wheeler Proposes $15.3 Million Tax Hike on Portland Businesses, Will Add 58 Police Officers

Willamette Week

The business license tax, which is 2.2 percent of a business’ net income, is the second largest source of money for the city’s general fund, after property taxes. In the 2016-17 budget, the tax brought in $118 million.

 

Wheeler proposes budget with boosts in taxes, cops

Portland Tribune

Wheeler’s budget requires a majority vote of the Portland City Council, which will hear public testimony on Wheeler’s proposals — as will a city budget committee. Individual City Commissioners will be able to propose changes as well.

 

5 Things To Know About Portland Mayor Wheeler’s Proposed Budget

Oregon Public Broadcasting

“The economy is clearly slowing, and we all know that economies work in cycles. What goes up comes down,” he said. “We are highly exposed to a recession at this point, all things being equal.”

 

Death penalty won’t be sought in Florida airport shooting

The Associated Press

After the shooting, the FBI says Santiago told agents in a confession that he acted under government mind control, then claimed inspiration by Islamic State extremists. No terrorism links have been found.

 

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

As Tax Cut Estimates Shift, Oregon Legislators Consider New Bills For Special Session

Oregon Public Broadcasting

As legislative leaders on both sides of the aisle preach the need for a session narrowly focused on tax cuts for a small subset of businesses, there are signs other lawmakers have different ideas.

 

Kate Brown’s tax plan would mostly benefit higher income earners

Oregonian/OregonLive

Under the tax break, people with pass-through businesses pay just 7 percent tax on income under $250,000, a rate otherwise reserved for joint filers with income up to $17,400. The Legislature created that tax break in 2013 during a special session aimed at trimming public pension costs and raising taxes.

 

Governor signs bill for Eastern Oregon field house

The Associated Press

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown signed a bill in La Grande that allocates $9 million for a new field house at Eastern Oregon University.

 

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

US May Day immigration protests target Trump, fall elections

The Associated Press

“Elections have consequences, and the consequences for our community have been dire, and if we do not change the balance of power, we question our ability to remain free in this country,” she said.

 

HOUSING

 

Rent Declined in 2017 in Portland’s Newly Constructed Buildings

Willamette Week

The rental situation varied for different sized units. The cost of the average studios citywide declined, while one-bedrooms saw small increases. But rents for two bedrooms increased on average by 5 percent, and rents for three bedrooms increased 10 percent.

 

Is size allowance for ‘missing middle’ houses too small?

Portland Tribune

“One of the key findings of Johnson’s dive into the market data was that a square foot of home is, basically, a square foot of home. Just giving a landowner the right to turn a structure into two smaller homes instead of one big one doesn’t add total value,” said Andersen

 

ELECTIONS

 

Oregon GOP teeters on dividing its base with too many candidates

Statesman Journal

“My wife and I talked, and we acknowledged that my numbers were not up there where they should be to win,” former candidate Bruce Cuff said. “So I picked the one candidate I think can win the primary and endorsed him.”

 

Capitol roundup: Initiative moves forward while candidates hit campaign trail

The Bend Bulletin

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum has filed a draft ballot title for Initiative Petition 43, a proposed gun control initiative seeking to qualify for the November general election ballot.

 

EDUCATION

 

Merkley talks education at LBCC town hall

Albany Democrat-Herald

“I’m against us having a defense budget that’s so expensive that we’re underfunding everything else,” Merkley said. The United States needs to move beyond policing the world and provide more funding for education, healthcare and infrastructure, Merkley said.

 

Lawsuit by Northwest Christian University instructor alleges racial discrimination

The Register-Guard

The plaintiff, Johnny Lake, alleges in the lawsuit that he lost his assistant instructor job after facing race-related discrimination at NCU. The suit describes the private, Christian university as a predominantly white institution with a reputation for being “unwelcoming” to students of color, female students, nonheterosexual students and students with disabilities.

 

The answer to Oregon’s dismal graduation rates? Start school later, doctors say

KGW

“Not only are students’ grades improving when you make school later, but you’re also showing they’re happier, they’re more productive,” he said. “It’s shown when you get more sleep, you tend to be a healthier person.”

 

District won’t allow students to read book on trans kid

The Associated Press

An Oregon school district has elected not to allow its third- through fifth-graders to participate in a statewide reading program after finding the content of one of the books inappropriate.

 

Students at Grant High School Posted a List of “Sexual Predators in the Hallways” in Girls’ Bathrooms Last Week

Willamette Week

“These signs were also photographed and then distributed via social media posts. As an administrative team, we work to ensure all students feel safe at Grant High School. These signs—singling out members of our community—make many students, not just those listed, feel unsafe at school.”

 

ENVIRONMENT

 

Reward in case of arrow-injured deer quadruples

Mail Tribune

According to photos provided by OSP, one animal had been shot through in an area of its body between the shoulder and the neck, while the other had been shot through the face near its eye, neither a spot a hunter would target if he intended to kill the animal quickly.

 

SAFETY

 

Dozens with ties to supremacist gangs arrested in Texas

The Associated Press

Federal authorities say dozens of people associated with white-supremacist gangs in Texas have been indicted on drug trafficking charges, including four accused in a kidnapping in which a hatchet was used to chop off a victim’s finger.

 

US Border agency tests body cams on agents in 9 locations

The Associated Press

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is starting tests of body-worn cameras for employees at nine locations, potentially leading to a broad rollout that would make it the first federal law enforcement agency to use them on a large scale.

 

BUSINESS

 

Portland Uber and Lyft Drivers Plan Rally At City Hall To Demand Better Working Conditions

Willamette Week

It’s the latest volley in a longstanding war between the Oregon AFL-CIO and the ride-hailing giants who invaded Portland in 2014 in a major blow to the taxi industry. The AFL-CIO slowed Uber’s entry into Portland for more than a year—before the company steamrolled labor and regulators by operating without permits.

 

With judge’s ruling, Portland climate-related tax moves closer to ballot

Oregonian/OregonLive

If the petition makes the ballot and is adopted by Portland voters, it would charge businesses with at least $1 billion in total sales and $500,000 in Portland sales a 1 percent surcharge.

 

OPINION

 

More pressing issues for Oregon

East Oregonian

That tax break might be worthwhile, although the details have been sketchy. But we wonder why Brown can’t let the tax break wait for the 2019 Legislature, yet she is leaving a slew of more-important issues hanging.

 

Letter: Why I want to serve Oregon’s 2nd District

East Oregonian

I’m running for Congress because government should make people’s lives better, not harder.

 

Nominee for GOP seat in 5th District challenged for his statements about Schrader

Statesman Journal

Nation’s ignorance and inexperience are made clear by his use of slander and grandiose promises that he can neither explain nor fulfill.

 

Cepeda: Don’t judge Latinos who patrol the border until you walk in their shoes

Statesman Journal

Ever since President Donald Trump announced he wants to hire 5,000 more border patrol agents, Latinos interested in joining the agency have flocked to citizens academies sponsored by CBP, The Los Angeles Times reported last week.

 

Tax cuts were supposed to save the GOP from Trump. Oops.

The Register-Guard

Just 27 percent of Americans believe the GOP tax overhaul was a good idea, according to a recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. Even among Republican voters, the tax cuts are not exactly thunderously popular: A little more than half (56 percent) say they were a good idea.

 

White best choice against Walden

Herald and News

If we were to ask Greg Walden which Democratic candidate is he most concerned about winning the primary, we are betting he would say Tim White. Why? Because Tim White is committed to fighting for our district.

 

Walden 100 percent for Trump agenda

Herald and News

Again, 2018, finds District 2 needing a candidate who understands campaign finance reform is at the heart of breaking the power of corporations and the ultra-wealthy to buy candidates, the power to write favorable legislation, and the power to pass its legislation.

 

Congress must reclaim its authority over acts of war taken by a president

Herald and News

It is time for Congress to act. We should take back the unlimited authority the president believes he has. We should act in a bipartisan manner to define what military action the president can and can’t take against terrorist groups.