Daily Clips

 

TOP STORIES

 

Oregon State Bar’s statement on ‘white nationalism’ draws criticism

Oregonian/OregonLive

Two signed statements in the latest Oregon State Bar bulletin – one by the bar condemning speech that incites violence and the other by non-bar specialty groups decrying the rise of the white nationalist movement under President Trump —  have drawn fire from some lawyers aghast that the bar would allow such political statements. “I am distressed to learn that my bar dues are being used to promote a left-wing agenda,” wrote Darcia Krause, another Portland lawyer.

 

Salem police officer resigns after alleged hit-and-run, DUI

Statesman Journal

DUI, criminal mischief and hit-and-run charges were filed against Omar DeMarco, 39, of West Salem, on April 6 — almost two months after he allegedly side-swiped an unoccupied car parked near Glen Creek Park.

 

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

Capitol roundup: ‘Oregon Promise’ college grants to reach more students

The Bend Bulletin
Good news for community college students, bad news for legal marijuana sellers, a notable endorsement in the Republican primary for governor, and a big deadline top the collection of start-of-the-week news from the Capitol and around the state.

 

Portland Burgerville workers approve federally recognized union

Oregonian/OregonLive

Workers at a Burgerville in Southeast Portland overwhelmingly approved the formation of a federally-recognized union, making them the first to do so since a fast-food labor fight erupted nationally five years ago.

 

ELECTIONS

 

Labor commissioner: Elected or appointed?

The Portland Tribune

Should the commissioner of the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries be elected or appointed? While technically a nonpartisan position, some critics argue that elections politicize the office, lead to partisan policies and detract from the professionalism of the role.

 

Salem attorney says Senate candidate is making false claims

The Portland Tribune

A Salem attorney is alleging a Washington County candidate for state Senate has improperly portrayed himself as a Certified Public Accountant.

 

Buehler Looks To November As Other Republicans Question His Conservatism

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Buehler’s campaign team remains confident of victory in the Republican primary. But there are 10 candidates in the race and two of them in particular – retired U.S. Navy aviator Greg Wooldridge and Bend businessman Sam Carpenter – appear to be mounting the strongest challenges.

 

East Portland Senate Race Could Change Oregon’s Housing Laws

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Monroe has earned the ire of tenant-right advocates who are upset he didn’t support an effort to overturn a statewide ban on rent control. As a result, he’s engaged in a fierce primary battle in East Portland to keep the job he’s held off and on for decades.

 

Six candidates vying for East Lane seat on county Board of Commissioners

The Register-Guard

The six-candidate race for the East Lane seat on the Lane County Board of Commissioners is the most crowded campaign in a local election since seven candidates vied for a Springfield City Council race in 2010.

 

GUNS

 

Mental health and guns an issue after Waffle House attack

Mail Tribune

Signs of paranoid delusions continued: In August, Reinking told police he wanted to file a report about 20 to 30 people tapping into his computer and phone and people “barking like dogs” outside his residence, according to a report. “There’s certainly evidence that there’s some sort of mental health issues involved,” Tazewell County Sheriff Robert Huston said.

 

Ballot measure would ban gun control

The Associated Press

The proposed Second Amendment Preservation Ordinance was filed with the Deschutes County clerk last week. It would empower the county sheriff to review federal, state and local laws and determine whether they violate the U.S. or Oregon constitutions.

 

ENVIRONMENT

 

Tensions rise at KID; Irrigators allege water mismanagement

Herald and News

Despite some hope of a favorable decision for irrigators, tensions reached near boiling point Monday morning as patrons at KID and board member Grant Knoll demanded answers from the BOR. “The bureau is not managing the water,” Knoll said. “We’re demanding management.”

 

Controlled burn shrouds Bend in smoke Monday morning

The Bend Bulletin

The prescribed burn was part of the Forest Service’s effort to reduce fuel for wildfires later this summer. Alex Enna, prescribed fire manager for the Deschutes National Forest, said the burn was particularly vital, given the parcel’s proximity to Bend and the amount of fuel that had built up in the area.

 

Forest Service considers limits on some Cascades wilderness areas

Herald and News

Federal officials are taking public comments on management strategies for five central Oregon wilderness areas that include possible restrictions on the number of visitors. The U.S. Forest Service on Thursday released its draft “Central Cascades Wilderness Strategies Project”, The Bulletin reported.

 

Clackamas Eyeglass Maker To Pay $750,000 For Discharging Hazardous Waste

Oregon Public Broadcasting

“By failing to disclose its discharges to Clackamas County, the company operated completely outside pretreatment regulations for years,” the U.S. Attorney for Oregon’s office said in a release. In January, the company pleaded guilty to one count of violating the Clean Water Act.

 

EDUCATION

 

School district shakes up central office staff – cuts 35
The Portland Tribune

Superintendent Guadalupe Guerrero is following through on his promises to slash the administrative budget in Portland Public Schools. The effect is continued churn in the district’s administrative positions with 35 positions being eliminated and a restructuring of several departments.

 

PPS Cuts Jobs At Central Office As Key Leaders Resign

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The central office cuts come as the district intends a net increase of 21 positions at its schools. Portland also has to fund pay raises for teachers in the contract it settled earlier this year.

 

OPINION

 

Reschke only represents the local area gun owners

Herald and News

Most people want assault weapons and military style guns banned, not guns for hunting and self-defense and we want universal background checks to be expanded to include gun shows.

 

Our view: Moderate candidates offer best challenge to incumbents

East Oregonian

If Republicans want the best chance to win the governorship in November, they should vote for Buehler this May.

 

Editorial: Deschutes voters should choose Baney, DeBone

The Bend Bulletin Editorial Board

Tony DeBone, of La Pine, holds the Position 1 seat, while Tammy Baney, of Bend, is the Position 3 seatholder. They’re opposed by Ed Barbeau and Patti Adair, respectively. The two incumbents, DeBone and Baney, are the better choices to serve the county.

 

ICE harvests bitter fruit of dehumanization

The Register-Guard

This is an issue ripe for more rigorous congressional oversight — even an independent commission to investigate charges of physical and sexual abuse in the ICE system. But this would require a critical mass of elected Republicans to give a damn about the rights and dignity of migrants. It is a distant dream.

Daily Clips

April 23, 2018 Daily Clips

 

Multiple People Are Hit by Van at Two Locations in Toronto, Police Say
The New York Times

TOP STORIES

 

Clinton: Free press is under ‘open assault’ in Trump era

The Associated Press

“We are living through an all-out war on truth, facts and reason,” Clinton said at the PEN America World Voices Festival, in Manhattan. “When leaders deny things we can see with our own eyes, like the size of a crowd at the inauguration, when they refuse to accept settled science when it comes to urgent challenges like climate change … it is the beginning of the end of freedom, and that is not hyperbole. It’s what authoritarian regimes through history have done.”

 

Supreme Court wrestles with administrative law judge case

The Associated Press

The question the justices are being asked to decide is whether the SEC’s administrative law judges are employees or instead “inferior officers” of the United States. The answer is important in determining who can appoint them.

 

ELECTIONS

 

Three candidates in the running for state labor commissioner

The Register-Guard

The state labor commissioner race is “the most important race that nobody has ever heard of,” in the opinion of candidate Val Hoyle of Eugene. Whether or not that’s true, a spirited campaign is unfolding between Hoyle, a former state legislator, and Lou Ogden, who has served as mayor of Tualatin for more than 20 years.

 

‘OPB Politics Now’: Oregon’s Republican Primary Election And The November Matchup

Oregon Public Broadcasting

On the latest episode of “OPB Politics Now,” OPB political reporters Lauren Dake, Jeff Mapes and Dirk VanderHart take a look at the Republican primary and what a November matchup between Buehler and Governor Kate Brown could look like.

 

Buehler: diverse experience, leadership key to campaign

Albany Democrat-Herald

Republican Knute Buehler believes he can unseat Democratic Gov. Kate Brown in November because “There’s no one else like me. I have a great diversity of experiences.”

 

GOP hopefuls running for chance at Gov. Brown

The Bend Bulletin

Ten Republicans are running to try and break the streak. Six qualified to be included in the voters’ pamphlet. The Bulletin asked that group to answer three questions to give voters a sample of their views.

 

Crowded Republican primary for Oregon governor tighter than expected

Statesman Journal

With ballots going out to voters within the week, long-presumed gubernatorial front-runner Rep. Knute Buehler has, at best, yet to create any meaningful distance between himself and other top candidates in the Republican gubernatorial primary.

 

Gov. Kate Brown maintains huge advantages over primary opponents

Statesman Journal

Jim Moore, director of the Tom McCall Center for Policy Innovation at Pacific University in Forest Grove, said he gives Neville and Jones a “zero percent chance” of winning because of Brown’s experience and incumbent and financial advantages.

 

GOP forum: Governor candidates cordial, but pointed

Herald and News

About 90 people turned out to hear the candidates for the two-hour forum at the Shilo Inn grand ballroom. Topics ranged from 2nd Amendment protections to illegal aliens and sanctuary states, to Public Employee Retirement System PERS funding solutions to reducing Salem’s influence on rural Oregon and ousting incumbent Democrat Kate Brown.

 

Independent Party’s internal conflict highlighted in Oregon governor race

Statesman Journal

There is a central conflict within Oregon’s third major political party that the gubernatorial primary readily illustrates: How can Independents simultaneously work to build a distinct platform while remaining open as an option for individuals to more easily run for elected office in a landscape dominated by Republicans and Democrats.

 

Long-Term Care Group Endorses Candidates in Contested Primaries

The Lund Report

The Oregon Health Care Association has waded into the 2018 primary season, supporting Marty Wilde, one of two Democrats battling to replace outgoing Rep. Phil Barnhart of Eugene, the longest-serving Democrat in the Oregon House, according to a Lund Report review of the latest healthcare sector campaign contributions.

 

Ron Wyden to host Washington County town hall April 28

The Portland Tribune

“Open-to-all town halls play a big part in what I call the ‘Oregon Way,’ where any person can ask any question in a public meeting,” Wyden said in a news release. “Throwing open the doors of government for town halls to have these conversations is a must in our democracy, and I very much look forward to hearing from Oregonians.”

 

LOCAL

 

Libel suit filed against Curry County

The Curry Coastal Pilot

The Civil Liberties Defense Center has sent a notice to Curry County commissioners announcing their intent to sue for $100,000 on behalf of resident Catherine Wiley, who claims a former county employee libeled her.

 

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT

 

Pyrosome population growing again off of Oregon coast

Corvallis Gazette-Times

Whatever caused these “pyrosome blooms” has so far stumped researchers, but “something happened,” said Weitkamp. “We’re all kind of scratching our heads trying to figure out what it was that happened.”

 

Oregon Fish and Wildlife commissioners back gillnetters

The Daily Astorian

Oregon and Washington state adopted a policy nearly six years ago to slowly phase gillnetters off the river’s main stem, but Oregon has second-guessed the wisdom of the decision.

 

Walden gains Energy Secretary commitment on BPA privatization

Hood River News

Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River), chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, last week secured a commitment from Energy Secretary Rick Perry to not sell off assets of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) without Congressional authorization, Walden’s office said in a press statement. During a hearing at the Energy and Commerce Committee, Walden said the administration’s proposal would have a negative impact on Oregonians and consumers throughout the Pacific Northwest.

 

PUBLIC HEALTH

 

There’s A Cure For Hepatitis C, But Oregon Limits Access

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The new drugs cure more than 90 percent of hepatitis C infections, and they can stop the progression of liver disease. David said patients, particularly those with a history of drug use, have to jump through too many hoops to qualify for treatment.

 

Health Officials Want You To Prepare For Wildfire Smoke Now

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Wildfire smoke is made up of what’s called fine particulate matter. Those particles are much smaller than the diameter of a human hair, and when you breathe them in, the particles can affect your heart and lungs. HEPA air filtration systems can remove those particles from the air.

 

GUNS

 

Portland mayor says he’ll work on city ban of assault-style weapons

KATU

“I support a ban on assault-style weapons,” Wheeler said to the teens. “The majority of Americans support common sense gun legislation, but Congress has failed. You have lit a fire under the politics of this nation… you have made a difference.”

 

Group protests infringement of Second Amendment at Pendleton rally

East Oregonian

Seventy-five people turned out for a rally in Pendleton on Saturday morning to support their right to own and carry firearms. The group gathered at Til Taylor Park in a coordinated effort with other gun-rights rallies throughout Oregon.

 

Medford gun supporters prepare for ballot showdown

Mail Tribune

Speakers at a pro-gun rally Saturday outside Medford City Hall urged “respectful” opposition to a pair of statewide firearms initiatives and touted a possible Jackson County ballot measure to protect gun rights locally.

 

OPINION

 

Starting the serious work to turn Oregon around: Guest opinion

The Oregonian/OregonLive

In other words, the financial challenges are not primarily the result of a shortfall in funds, but rather they are driven by costs that are growing faster than tax receipts can keep up — even when the economy is at its healthiest.

 

Guest column: Vote Sam Carpenter to make Oregon great again

The Bend Bulletin

Carpenter has the makings of a superb relationship with the president, and he is the only one who has a specific plan to turn our state around. Elect Sam Carpenter and he will “Make Oregon Great Again.”

 

Editorial: Republicans should pick Walden

The Bend Bulletin Editorial Board

U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, is clearly the best choice among Republicans running in the primary race for Oregon’s 2nd Congressional District. Vote for Walden in the Republican primary for Congress.

 

Editorial: Face climate change risks

The Register-Guard

State Treasurer Tobias Read announced on Friday that, as a major institutional investor, Oregon is going to be ramping up pressure at shareholder meetings when it comes to how companies are preparing for, or dealing with, climate change.

 

Editorial: Governor’s tax break is small potatoes

Corvallis Gazette-Times

Brown’s proposal won’t be enough to shield her from Republican attacks that she should have vetoed Senate Bill 1528; had she done so (and, to be fair, she did appear to be undecided on this for weeks), many more businesses would have received a tax break.

 

Op-ed: Voters need to send legislature another message against illegal immigration

East Oregonian

Ours is a government of, by and for the people. So send your elected representatives the message they need to hear. This spring, sign the IP 22 petition. And in November, vote to repeal the sanctuary law. By doing so, you’ll take another step to force our lawmakers to listen to us — and to stop enacting policies that encourage illegal immigration to our state.

 

George Will: Gorsuch strikes blow against administrative state

Mail Tribune

If he can persuade his fellow court conservatives to see why they were mistaken in disagreeing with him, and if he can persuade his liberal colleagues to follow the logic of their decision with which he concurred, the judiciary will begin restoring constitutional equilibrium.

 

Daily Clips

TOP STORIES

 

Trial postponed for suspended state judge who refused to marry gay people

Associated Press

Marion County Judge Julie Frantz on Monday granted a motion to move the trial from Day’s home county, where he faces charges of giving guns to a felon. The ruling, made by Frantz from the bench, was announced in a Monday release by a spokesman for the Oregon Judicial Department.

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods destroying guns it pulled from shelves

Associated Press

The retailer said Tuesday that it is in the process of destroying all the firearms it pulled from its shelves, rather than trying to return them to their manufacturers.

 

STATE GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

Current and Former Employees at Business Oregon Want Gov. Kate Brown to Fix the Agency’s “Bro Club” Culture

Willamette Week

Gov. Kate Brown this week pledged to launch an investigation into the state’s economic development agency, Business Oregon. The move follows a letter from a dozen current and even more former employees who describe toxic working conditions.

 

RESEARCH & COMMENTARY: States Move to Re-Impose Unnecessary Net Neutrality Rules

The Heartland Institute

On April 9, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) signed a bill that would prevent the state from doing business with internet providers that throttle internet traffic. Net neutrality proponents have argued without net neutrality laws, ISPs would be able to create tiered high-speed access lanes on the internet. They argue this would inevitably lead to the wealthiest customers getting access to the fastest connections and relegating lower-income consumers to lower-speed connections. To date, there has been no indication this doomsday scenario will take place.

 

Heard’s House Seat Declared Vacant

KQEN News Radio

The person selected will fill the seat for the rest of 2018. A few weeks ago, Douglas County Commissioner Gary Leif filed for the Republican nomination for the seat while Megan Salter filed for the Democratic nomination. The person picked by voters in the 2018 General Election will take the House seat starting in 2019.

 

ELECTIONS

 

Voter numbers surge in Jackson County

Mail Tribune

While there are record numbers of registered voters, the turnout may hit only 45 to 50 percent, Walker said. Primary elections typically have lower turnout than general elections. One of the biggest surprises this election season is the number of nonaffiliated voters, or those not registered with any party.

 

A Hyper-Partisan Race for Oregon Labor Commissioner Turns Remarkably Nasty

Willamette Week

Brad Avakian led the most aggressive and partisan Bureau of Labor and Industries this state has seen in recent memory. He is not seeking reelection, and the race to replace him is shaping up to be just as aggressive and partisan. It has also turned surprisingly nasty. Here’s what you need to know.

 

The Dialogue: What Readers Had to Say About the Candidates Campaigning to Unseat State Senator Rod Monroe

Willamette Week

“No more landlords in our Legislature!”

 

Coos County State Rep. Caddy McKeown holds town hall at Marshfield High School

The World Link

Coos County State Rep. Caddy McKeown, D-Coos Bay, spoke with citizens of Coos Bay on Tuesday night at Marshfield High School in a town hall meeting to promote her re-election.

 

HOUSING

 

Road to homeownership gets rockier this spring as rates rise

Corvallis Gazette-Times

First-time buyers already face significant hurdles to homeownership because starter homes have seen the steepest price increases as well as sharpest decline in the number of homes on the market. Higher mortgage rates only further limit what buyers can afford.

 

AGRICULTURE & ENVIRONMENT

City, DEQ deal with fuel spill on Amazon Creek

The Register-Guard

They said the fuel apparently flowed into a catch basin at the southeast corner of West 18th Avenue and Bailey Hill Road, and then traveled through a stormwater outfall pipe that empties into the creek off Bailey Hill Road.

 

Eastern Oregon Ranchers Push To Kill Pine Creek Wolves

East Oregonian

Northeast Oregon ranchers are again seeking to eradicate the entire Pine Creek wolf pack from Baker County after the apex predators attacked livestock for the third time in just over a week.

 

Oregon Grew More Cannabis Than Customers Can Smoke. Now Shops and Farmers Are Left With Mountains of Unwanted Bud

Willamette Week

In February, state officials announced that 1.1 million pounds of cannabis flower were logged in the state’s database. If a million pounds sounds like a lot of pot, that’s because it is: Last year, Oregonians smoked, vaped or otherwise consumed just under 340,000 pounds of legal bud. That means Oregon farmers have grown three times what their clientele can smoke in a year.

 

EDUCATION

 

Beaverton school official resigns after immigration retweet
The Register-Guard

A Beaverton School District deputy superintendent who retweeted a claim that immigrants in the country without legal permission “were more dangerous than assault rifles” and should be banned from the U.S. has resigned.

 

State education administrator fired after complaints

Portland Tribune

Mitch Kruska was dismissed in March after alleged bullying and harassment of colleagues and questions about his attempts to use state education money for a special program in Lake Oswego.

 

National School Walkout: Portland students planning Friday rally and march to City Hall

The Oregonian

The Portland rally is a demonstration against police brutality and for stricter gun control from either Congress or the Oregon Legislature. School shootings get a lot of attention, Mayne said, but they’re only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gun violence.

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: Did Gov. Brown pick the right priority for a special session?

Bend Bulletin Editorial Board

Take your pick. Oregon faces many urgent challenges. Improving schools. Improving jobs. Improving health care. Passing PERS reform. Those are all big topics. Any one could fill a weeks-long special session to work toward solutions. As worthy a topic as a small-business tax break might be, though, doesn’t it seem something else might be a critically urgent problem Oregon faces?

 

District 9: McKeown

The Register-Guard

Whoever wins the Democratic primary will face Republican Teri Grier, a community college instructor who worked in politics in Arizona, in the general election. Grier, who is unopposed in the GOP primary, won the nomination last time as a write-in candidate. McKeown defeated Grier by a margin of less than four percentage points in 2016. If Democrats want to hang onto the District 9 seat, McKeown is their best chance to do so.

 

Oregon lawmaker challenged for Second Amendment claim

Statesman Journal

State Rep. E. Werner Reschke’s April 13 guest opinion criticizing current gun-control efforts, collapsed when he repeated this new, gun-rights claim: “First Amendment (rights) are completely dependent on the Second Amendment.” His guest opinion collapsed because 219 years of Constitutional history debunks the claim.

 

City needs to enforce political lawn sign regulations

Statesman Journal

Clusters of signs are growing in public right-of-ways during this special election season in Salem and as the mid-term elections this fall grow near. This is not permitted, and hence, enforcement needs to ramp up.

 

Editorial: Gloom, doom mounts on state pension woes

Corvallis Gazette-Times

The Times reporter, Mary Williams Walsh, journeyed to Southern Oregon, where governments are feeling a particularly fierce bite from rising PERS premiums and have no recourse but to deeply slice into the services they offer their constituents. The same story is playing out, to different degrees, all through the state.

 

Nations cry ‘fake news’ as a convenient excuse

The Register-Guard

President Trump pioneered the use of the term “fake news” to discredit any report he didn’t like. Now, the same allegation is being used against the United States abroad by adversaries, and against legitimate authorities at home by those credibly accused of misdeeds.

If Trump’s goal was to debase the very notion of truth, then he can truly say, “Mission accomplished.”

 

 

Daily Clips

TOP STORIES

 

Primary election deadlines approaching  

Herald and News

The election will decide multiple county races as well as allow members of individual parties to select their candidates for the Nov. 6 general election.

 

IRS payment site fails on tax day, but you still have to pay  

Herald and News

IRS Acting Commissioner David Kautter testified during a House Oversight Hearing Tuesday that a number of systems are down at the moment and that the agency is working to resolve the issue.

 

Oregon jobless rate remains at historic low for 15th straight month

The Oregonian

The state is enjoying nearly unprecedented economic strength, driven in part by nation’s long economic expansion and in part by a surge of young, educated workers migrating into the state. That, in turn, has increased demand for social service jobs, educators, construction workers and other middle-wage jobs.

 

STATE GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

 

Capitol roundup: Home stretch for primary election

The Bend Bulletin

The cherry blossoms on the grounds of the Capitol are blooming, signaling the true arrival of spring. This year the blossoms also signal the approaching primary election, now just a month away.

 

USS Portland? Democratic Socialists of America and Other Portland Activists Are Ready to Protest Naming a Navy Warship After the Rose City

Willamette Week

The Portland Democratic Socialists of America object to naming a warship after Portland. Other groups like Portland’s Resistance, Veterans for Peace, Portland Rising Tide, and the Portland Committee for Human Rights in the Philippines have joined the DSA in protesting the ship.

The protest will take place in North Portland and demonstrators will march to the site of the commissioning ceremony on April 21.

 

PUBLIC SAFETY

 

Plea deal prevents lifetime sex offender tag

The Bend Bulletin

A young Redmond man will avoid a lifetime sex offender label in exchange for taking a plea deal.

 

EDUCATION

 

Brown to sign university funding bill at OSU-Cascades

The Bend Bulletin

The Oregon Legislature passed a bill last session giving OSU-Cascades $39 million for its second academic building, after approving just $9.5 million of the $69.5 million university leaders requested in 2017. State funding, plus a $10 million match from private donors, will pay for a new building devoted to science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics.

 

State report: Minority groups still face college barriers  

Corvallis Gazette-Times

Despite a slowly rising completion rate for college students statewide, the report released Monday by the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission identified what it called significant gaps especially along lines of race and ethnicity. Some groups in the report were as much as 40 percent less likely to graduate, and others were more likely to report financial difficulties.

 

Woman files bullying lawsuit against Springfield schools  

Corvallis Gazette-Times

The Springfield School District is being sued in federal court by a woman who says officials at a middle school failed to protect her child from being bullied and assaulted.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

 

Supreme Court strikes down as vague part of immigration law
Associated Press

With the four other conservative justices in dissent, it was the vote of the Trump appointee that was decisive in striking down the provision at issue. Gorsuch did not join all of Kagan’s opinion, but he agreed with her that the law could not be left in place. Gorsuch wrote that “no one should be surprised that the Constitution looks unkindly on any law so vague that reasonable people cannot understand its terms and judges do not know where to begin in applying it.”

 

Syrian refugees admitted to US drop to just 44 in 6 months
Associated Press

The United States, which traditionally took in the largest number of refugees, has scaled back its resettlement program under the Trump administration. The U.S. has welcomed more than 20,000 Syrian refugees since 2011, including around 2,000 since President Donald Trump took office. However, since November, admissions have nearly screeched to a halt, with only 11 Syrian refugees getting in.

 

Trump criticizes California governor on troops at border

Mail Tribune

Trump tweeted: “Looks like Jerry Brown and California are not looking for safety and security along their very porous Border. He cannot come to terms for the National Guard to patrol and protect the Border. The high crime rate will only get higher. Much wanted Wall in San Diego already started!”

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: A pair of PERS inequities

The Register-Guard

There’s nothing anyone can do about it: Spilde and the other 2,143 retirees collecting pensions of more than $100,000 played by rules that the courts say can’t be changed. Those rules create problems that are corrosive in terms of public support for government at all levels, and in terms of generational equity.

 

Editorial: Governor and Legislature need to do more about PERS

The Bend Bulletin Editorial Board

Brown and voters should be embarrassed that after four years of her leadership schools and other public entities are being forced to cut services. Oregon needs a governor committed to doing more about PERS. Demand statewide candidates explain what they are going to do to reform PERS. Vote for the candidates who will deliver change in the May primary.

 

Editorial: Kiely the best choice for District 53 Dems

The Bend Bulletin

Both may do a respectable job, if elected. Kiely seems to have the edge. She has spent more time in Oregon than her opponent, giving her a notably better understanding of the state and its problems. That’s important in a Legislature dominated by lawmakers who represent urban areas far different from the small communities of District 53.

 

Letter: An explanation for GOP exodus  

Corvallis Gazette-Times

Despite Trump’s unpopularity, he does have a solid base, most of the districts are gerrymandered to the GOP’s advantage, and the GOP delivered the tax cuts for the wealthy that their campaign donors insisted was do-or-die, so their prospects for re-election can’t be that bad.

 

Michael Gerson: Ryan will be remembered for his submission to Trump

Mail Tribune

God help us. Clearly, Paul Ryan could not. The speaker, like many others, underestimated the power of the presidency to shape and define the GOP. Trump’s influence is now pervasive — leaving many Republican legislators privately contemptuous of the president and publicly silent or supportive. Given the base’s enthusiasm for Trump, many elected Republicans now feel they must choose between hypocrisy and political suicide. There is a third choice: Leave politics entirely. I suspect Ryan is not the last Republican who will exercise this option.

 

Letters: Are students pawns for political groups?

Portland Tribune

I find it hard that an American can support censorship, suppression of free thoughts and human rights, yet American colleges are now openly suppressing conservative professors and students. Is this the “New America”?

 

Liberal echo chamber in Portland schools: Letter to the editor

The Oregonian

A teacher who dares to reprimand a black student for back talk is accused of being racist. A teacher who may have an opinion other than the ultra-left leaning rhetoric popular at the schools today is labeled a Nazi. No conversations are allowed between dissenting voices, because if you disagree you are evil, period. What is going on with our schools?

 

Daily Clips

 

STATE GOVERNMENT

 

Oregon governor declares drought emergency in second county

Associated Press

Brown on Friday announced a drought emergency in Grant County because of low snowpack, lack of precipitation, low streamflows and warming temperatures.

 

Secretary of State touts ‘transparent’ elections

Portland Tribune

While Oregon was the first state to adopt the vote-by-mail system, Richardson said the title is somewhat of a misnomer. About 60 percent of Oregonians are now dropping off their paper ballots, not mailing them. “There are a number of states that jumped right into computer (voting) that are now going back to paper, because you can’t hack paper,” he commented. “To me, voting should be a nonpartisan issue.”

 

PUBLIC SAFETY

 

Lane County deputy fired amid sexual abuse allegations

Register-Guard

In the rape case filed last month, Hitson is accused of giving marijuana and alcohol to an 18-year-old woman. Prosecutors filed two first-degree rape charges under alternate theories. One alleges Hitson used “forcible compulsion” to rape the woman. The other accuses Hitson of raping the woman while she was “incapable of consent by reason of physical helplessness.”

 

EDUCATION

 

Central Oregon districts keep teacher shortage at bay

Bend Bulletin  

Despite a teacher shortage around the country, school districts in Central Oregon have really only felt the pinch of a teacher shortage when trying to fill positions for math, science and special-education classes.

 

ECONOMY

 

Online sales tax at stake in Supreme Court case

Portland Business Journal

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday on whether states can charge sales taxes to online purchases from retailers that have no physical presence in their state.

 

LOCAL NEWS

 

Deschutes County again listed among fastest-growing in nation

Bend Bulletin  

Between July 1, 2016, and July 1, 2017, the county’s population grew 3.4 percent from an estimated 180,675 to 186,875, according to the Census Bureau. The census report notes migration is the driving factor behind the population increases in the region.

 

Renewable biofuels plant to be built in Lakeview, Oregon

Albany Democrat-Herald

The Herald and News reports the facility in Lakeview is expected to annually convert 136,000 tons of woody biomass and forest bi-products into 15 million gallons of renewable fuels.

 

IMMIGRATION

 

Opposition to immigrant sanctuary spreading in California

Associated Press

Most of the local governments siding with the Trump administration are in Orange County, an area once considered a GOP stronghold but that voted for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. But it’s starting to spread.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

 

US To Announce New Economic Sanctions On Russia

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations is expected to announce a new round of economic sanctions against Russia for its backing of Syrian President Bashar al Assad’s alleged use of chemical weapons.

 

Trump’s personal attorney also represents Fox News host Sean Hannity, lawyers reveal

The World Link

President Donald Trump’s personal attorney has been forced to reveal that another of his clients is Fox News host Sean Hannity.

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: Nation’s debt reaches new heights

Albany Democrat-Herald

But we need to hear this: By 2020, just two years from now, the nation’s annual federal deficit is due to surpass $1 trillion, according to projections released this month by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. That’s a big number.

 

Portland must do more to mitigate fossil fuel risks: Guest opinion

The Oregonian

Despite the glaring oversights and appalling safety issues highlighted in the 2012 report, the industries that make their home in Northwest Portland — many fossil fuel-oriented — have simply refused to make safety improvements. If the State of Oregon and fossil fuel industry refuse to take these risks seriously, local government must continue to utilize its legitimate authority and act to protect Portland’s residents.

 

Make a threat, expect consequences

The World Link

Following the shooting threat at North Bend School District last week, people to need to pay heed to law enforcement’s threat that there will be consequences.

 

Oregon Pension Crisis Makes National News – And Kate Brown Still Won’t Take Action

Oregon GOP Chair Calls Out Governor for Dangerous Negligence Threatening To Devour Public Services

The New York Times explains:

“Oregon now has fewer police officers than in 1970, is losing foster-care workers at an alarming rate and has allowed earthquake and tsunami preparations to lapse. A 2016 survey turned up ‘a large number of bridges with critical and near-critical conditions’ because of ‘longstanding inadequate funding.’”

“…Oregon’s unusual method for calculating pensions tends to generate lavish payouts.”

“Kate Brown has refused to make reforming PERS a priority, betraying Oregonians time and time again.  Oregon needs a governor who is committed to solving this problem, not a governor who spends her time focused on hiking taxes to make herself a national left-wing celebrity and collecting fat campaign contributions for it,” stated Oregon Republican Chairman Bill Currier.

“Governor Brown is now not only the most anti-small business Governor in Oregon history, her dangerous negligence in addressing Oregon’s massive PERS crisis threatens to devour our state and local government finances, leaving the many vital public services it funds in shambles,” said Chair Currier.

“Oregonians deserve better than a negligent, bungling, tax-hiking, radical George Soros-funded Governor who blows off Oregon’s big problems so she can hand Oregon taxpayers the bill after the election,” added Currier.

“It’s time to dump shallow politician Kate Brown and get a real Governor this November.”

The Oregon Republican Party is the state’s arm of the Republican National Committee. Its Chairman and officers are dedicated to promoting Republican principles within the state of Oregon and to improving the lives and livelihoods of Oregon’s working families through economic freedom and equal protection under the law.

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Oregon Republican Party

ONE CHOICE: Lou Ogden endorsed by Ore. State Chamber of Commerce

LOU OGDEN ENDORSED BY OREGON STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

BOLI race continues to heat up, endorsement signals small businesses want change

 

TUALATIN, Ore. — The Oregon State Chamber of Commerce yesterday announced Tualatin Mayor Lou Ogden has earned their endorsement to be Oregon’s next Commissioner for the Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI). With ballots being mailed next week and the primary election nearing an end, political observers have noted the BOLI race appears to be heating up as the Commissioner position is an open seat for the first time in nearly a decade.

 

“I truly appreciate the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce weighing in with their support for my candidacy. Oregonians know prosperity has not been shared evenly in our state. We need to ensure BOLI takes a lead in closing the skills-trade gap and rethinks its mission to include more technical support to small businesses,” Ogden said. “I am the only candidate in the race who has earned balanced, bipartisan support from elected leaders, businesses and members of community organizations. This endorsement is a key signal that Oregonians are ready for change.”

 

BOLI Commissioner is the only statewide elected office where candidates run as a non-partisan. Three candidates have turned put their name in the ring for the position. Ogden has served as a non-partisan mayor for nearly 24 years and has earned the endorsement of city and county leaders from across Oregon and across the political spectrum. Ogden believes this is because one of his opponents, former Democratic Majority Leader Val Hoyle, has been largely funded by unions and left-leaning special interest groups and out-of-state political action committees.

 

“For ten years, BOLI has been led by a hyper-partisan activist who was using the position as a stepping stone to higher office. People aren’t looking for Brad Avakian 2.0 for the next Commissioner,” Ogden added.

 

Ogden, who has been energetically touring the state talking to voters and local businesses, thanked the Chamber for their support.

 

The Oregon State Chamber of Commerce’s board is comprised of local chambers of commerce from communities across Oregon. They represent thousands of the smallest businesses in the state.

 

“Lou’s record of pro-business policies made him the top choice for OSCC,” said OSCC Government Affairs Council Chair Laura Edmonds. “In his current role as mayor of Tualatin, he has proven that he is supportive of business and jobs. It’s clear that he is aware of the disconnect that currently exists in BOLI between the agency and local businesses and we appreciate his desire to rebuild trust with the business community.”

 

OSCC said they endorsed Ogden for his pro-business record, including his history as a volunteer leader in local government for over 25 years. The chamber also noted his leadership in bringing $3 billion in private investment and 34,000 local jobs in Tualatin, which has about 27,000 residents. In their announcement OSCC highlighted Ogden’s pledge to make business and industry an equal partner at BOLI for the first time in decades.

 

“We need to end the idea of BOLI being a bully, and give industries an equal voice in our state,” Ogden added. “Oregonians can’t afford another four years with a self-serving Labor Commissioner who’s busy plotting their next political campaign instead of working to support our small businesses. The status quo is no longer acceptable if our goal is to solve real problems like getting workers into family-wage jobs and out of poverty.  Our next Commissioner needs to be focused on serving the people, not themselves.”

 

OSCC also noted that Hoyle’s extreme voting record in the state legislature was riddled with a pattern of votes that hurt small businesses. Hoyle had a 38-percent OSCC voting record, which was cited as grounds for failing their vetting process for an endorsement.

 

Unlike other statewide offices, BOLI could be decided by May 15 for any candidate who achieves over 50 percent of the vote. The race is solidly between Ogden and Hoyle as candidate Jack Howard failed to put forth a voter pamphlet statement.

 

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Daily Clips

 

Speaker Paul Ryan Will Not Seek Re-election in November

The New York Times

Mr. Ryan said he will serve until the end of this Congress in January, which will mark 20 years in Congress. He insisted he will be “leaving this majority in good hands with what I believe is a very bright future.”

 

ELECTIONS

 

Roseburg Republican Dallas Heard selected to replace disgraced ex-lawmaker Jeff Kruse

The Oregonian

Roseburg Republican Dallas Heard is expected to be sworn next week to temporarily replace Jeff Kruse, who resigned his Senate seat in February after he was found to have inappropriately touched women in the Capitol.

 

Republican candidate for Oregon Legislature frequently disparages Jews and Muslims on social media

Register-Guard

Powell has filed as a Republican but isn’t supported by the party, which has backed Mark Herbert, the other GOP candidate in the House District 11 race. Preston Mann, a spokesman for House Republicans’ campaign committee, on Monday called on Powell to withdraw from the race, after being informed of the social media postings by a reporter.

“Joshua Powell should not be running for public office,” Mann said in a written statement. “His record of bigotry and racial and religious hatred is disgusting and represents the worst fringes of our society. “If he refuses (to withdraw), I have no doubt the voters of House District 11 will deliver him the rebuke he deserves on May 15.”

 

State Sen. Rod Monroe Faces Something Rare: Two Credible Challengers in a Democratic Primary

Willamette Week

Now Portland is witnessing something nearly as rare as a dodo bird—a competitive primary for a Democratic incumbent. On each doorstep, Fagan mentions Monroe’s long tenure without a significant re-election challenge. “He’s been in office for over 40 years,” she says. “I think it’s time for a fresh look at some of the chronic challenges.” Fagan and Monroe’s other challenger, Kayse Jama, executive director of racial-justice and immigrant-rights nonprofit Unite Oregon, argue they will bring that change.

 

Three newcomers square off in labor commissioner race

Bend Bulletin

Ogden, 63, has been the mayor of Tualatin for the past 24 years. During his time in office, the Portland suburb attracted a branch of Lam Research, a California-based tech company that is the city’s largest employer. Ogden also oversaw the development of Bridgeport Village, an outdoor shopping mall that spans Tualatin and nearby Tigard, along with new roads and schools. He said his ability to collaborate sets him apart.

 

Two GOP Candidates for Gov. Face Off in Redmond

KBND

Central Oregon businessman Sam Carpenter says one of Oregon’s biggest problems is that no one is held responsible for using taxpayer dollars wisely. “What are the two most spendy sections of our economy? You have to ask yourself that before we can answer this question. One is Healthcare, and One is education. What is the commonality here? The government runs it.” He told the crowd he believes the best way to reform the government is to vote. “In America, every two years we get to go to the ballot box and change things; it’s a revolution opportunity every two years! This is what Trump was all about, isn’t it?”

 

STATE GOVERNMENT

 

Some question necessity of special session

East Oregonian

But Sen. Brian Boquist, R-Dallas, sees the special session as a political gambit. “This is about politics not policy,” Boquist wrote in an email to the EO/Pamplin Capital Bureau on Monday.

The lower tax rates were initially engineered in 2013 during a special session as part of a package referred to as the “Grand Bargain.” “Sole proprietors were kept out of the 2013 special session bill as the Democrats did not want to lose anymore revenue by adding them into the state (pass-through entity) law,” Boquist wrote. “Since I was in the room, I know this as fact. Now after raising taxes $244 million this biennium, and placing the funds in the ending balance, they want to be able to campaign on ‘tax cuts.’”

 

Top officials mum on information officer’s departure

East Oregonian

Top officials, including the governor, are mum about the reasons behind the recently announced resignation of Alex Pettit, the state’s chief information officer. But some say they want the next CIO to be someone who is collaborative, communicative and has a clear vision of how to meet the state’s wide-ranging information technology needs. Pettit, who has held the position since 2014, could not be reached for comment Tuesday.

 

Governor signs ‘net neutrality’ rules

Wallowa County Chieftain

Oregon and Washington’s new laws could be the beginning of a patchwork internet laws throughout the nation after the FCC’s decision to repeal net neutrality in December.

 

Governor signs Cleaner Air Oregon

Portland Tribune

Many lawmakers, including House Speaker Tina Kotek, D-Portland, expressed mixed emotions about the ultimate product. While Kotek voted for the bill, she later wrote that the compromise “undermined an 18-month public process that brought together stakeholders from all sides of the issue” to address the air toxics problem and propose the original legislation. She said the program would still make “Oregon a leader in air quality programs nationwide. Since the program addresses both new and existing facilities, it provides stronger protections than many air toxics programs across the country.”

 

Report: Oregon should end solitary confinement

Portland Tribune

Inmates with severe mental health conditions at Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem spend an average of nearly 23 hours per day in solitary confinement, according to a report released Tuesday by Disability Rights Oregon.  The state in many cases may be violating the inmates’ constitutional rights, the nonprofit advocacy group alleged. Isolation can exacerbate symptoms of mental illness, including depression and anxiety, and many prison systems around the nation have discontinued the practice, said Elizabeth Seaberry, a spokeswoman for the advocacy group.

 

DUI charge dropped against Oregon’s top prison doc

Bend Bulletin

The top doctor for the Oregon Department of Corrections will not be charged with a crime following an arrest late last year for alleged driving under the influence of intoxicants. Last week a Deschutes County judge approved an order dismissing charges against Bend resident Christopher Peter DiGiulio, who was pulled over Dec. 2 and arrested on suspicion of DUI.

 

EDUCATION

 

Oregon fourth-graders lose ground in math, no improvement in grade 8

The Oregonian

Oregon fourth-graders performed significantly worse in math last spring than they did two years earlier and neither fourth- nor eighth-graders registered gains in reading, results of a nationwide exam show.

 

WOLVES

 

Oregon grants rancher’s request to kill wolves

East Oregonian

The request asked that collared wolf OR-50, involved in repeated kills in Wallowa County last year, and seven additional wolves traveling with him, be killed to quell chronic cattle loss to wolves in northeastern Baker County.

 

OPINION

 

Endorsement: GOP Senate District 6

Register-Guard

Ruck is realistic about the size of some of the issues facing Oregon, and acknowledges they won’t be solved overnight. But her approach of tackling large issues one step at a time with clear goals and benchmarks is a refreshing one. Ruck deserves a chance to make her case to District 6 voters in the general election.

 

Editorial: A good start in Oregon

Register-Guard

The study found that the opioids performed no better than acetaminophen, an analgesic used in over-the counter medications such as Tylenol, or than a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Eugene next month will host the Oregon Conference on Opioids, Pain and Addiction. Hopefully, reducing the number of opioid prescriptions that are written in Oregon, and implementing strict statewide, uniform guidelines for the use of them, will be a key focus of the meeting.

 

Editorial: Richardson dodging Cambridge Analytica questions is disingenuous

Statesman Journal Editorial Board

Why isn’t Richardson showing Oregonians what his business was with Cambridge Analytica during his unsuccessful campaign against then-incumbent John Kitzhaber? We want to see the canceled check for $5,000. We want to see the survey results. If it wasn’t nefarious, why not satisfy curious minds and put the information out there for all to see. That would be the end of the story.

 

Editorial: Gun-storage measure moves toward ballot

Albany Democrat-Herald

“Voters were consistently enthusiastic about supporting safe gun storage and reducing gun violence,” said Paul Kemp, a chief petitioner for Oregonians for Safe Gun Storage, in a press release. “The fact that we were able to quickly gather almost twice the required number of sponsoring signatures gives us optimism about qualifying the measure and passing it in November.”

 

Guest: Williams damages local NAACP and Roger Stone’s reputations with remarks

Patrick Sheehan, Dorchester Board of Directors

Roger Stone is a lot of things, but a white nationalist is not one of them. When people Like Mr. Williams with the NAACP speak on behalf of their organizations to manipulate the public with dishonest rhetoric, they damage not only their own reputations, but those of whom they represent.

Pearl District Greg Walden Reception For Lou Ogden Labor Commissioner

I am excited to be running for Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor and Industries, BOLI.  I aim to put the “I” in BOLI as it is, after all, the Bureau of Labor AND Industries, and bring balance and fairness.  You may know that as Oregon’s only nonpartisan office, the May 15 election will likley determine the ultimate winner if I receive more than 50% of the vote, with no November election, so time is short.

I am proud to have the endorsement of Congressman Greg Walden and am asking you to join us with Greg this Saturday evening, April 14, downtown Portland, for a reception to support my race.  Come meet Greg, hear about my campaign and how we will win this May 15 election, with your help.  Please see the invitation below and make this reception your beginning of a Saturday night out on the town.